Martyna Majok and Danya Taymor on “queens”

In the new play “queens,” written by Martyna Majok and directed by Danya Taymor, a group of female immigrants find their paths crossing in a small apartment in Queens. We talk to Martyna and Danya about the process of writing and staging “queens,” autobiography in work, and how they structure their lives as theatre artists.

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Bernadette Peters: Young and Cute, Forever and Never

Bernadette Peters turns 70 this week. Her name is synonymous with American musical theatre—and the moniker “young and cute forever.” How did that happen? And has she ever really gotten the respect she deserves? We take a romp through 1970s Los Angeles, ’80s New York, and the brain of a ’90s pre-teen to find out how Bernadette Peters became a woman not afraid to take up a lot of space.

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The Gaze of María Irene Fornés: Michelle Memran on Her Documentary “The Rest I Make Up”

On February 16th, “The Rest I Make Up,” a documentary about the playwright María Irene Fornés will have its premiere. It’s the first documentary about Fornés, a playwright who was instrumental in forming Off-Off-Broadway theatre and America’s avant-garde theatre movement. We spoke with filmmaker Michelle Memran about the process of making the film, her relationship with Fornés, and the playwright’s legacy.

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An Interview with Dr. Indira Etwaroo

In 2015, Dr. Indira Etwaroo became Executive Director of the Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation and The Billie Holiday Theatre, which is part of the organization and was founded in 1972 as a destination and breeding ground for black artists. Only a few years into her tenure, she has already led a major renovation of the theatre’s physical space and re-invigorated its programming. We spoke to her about running a large arts institution, working with the community, funding, and being a woman in a leadership position.

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Dael Orlandersmith on “Until the Flood”

In 2015, playwright Dael Orlandersmith went to St. Louis to interview people about their thoughts on race and the death of Michael Brown, the unarmed black teenager killed by a police officer in 2014. From those interviews, she created fictional characters for her solo show, “Until the Flood.” We spoke to her about her process for creating “Until the Flood,” what she thinks people get wrong about her work, and how it has evolved.

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An Interview with Tina Landau

“SpongeBob SquarePants, The Broadway Musical” has become one of the most well-reviewed and popular musicals of the 2017-18 Broadway season. It came from the mind of Tina Landau, who not only directed the show but conceived it (it’s also the only Broadway musical directed by a woman this season). We recently sat down with to discuss how she conceived and brought “SpongeBob” to life, how she views directing, ambition, and more.

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An Interview with Split Britches: Peggy Shaw and Lois Weaver

Peggy Shaw and Lois Weaver founded Split Britches and the WOW Café in the East Village, which was a home for and central to the development of feminist and queer theatre. They’re now presenting “Unexploded Ordnances” at La MaMa. We talk with them about how their process for making work has evolved, changes in theatre since the 1980s, their thoughts on not getting the same credit as men, their legacy, and more.

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Ladies Who Launch: Four Actresses Who Started Their Own Businesses

There’s a group of women who have combined their artistic and business skills to create their own businesses in addition to their careers in the theatre. We talked to four of them—Jeanna De Waal, who runs Broadway Weekends, a theatre workshop for adults; Sas Goldberg, who owns Name Glo, a neon sign company; Sydney Morton, who started a party planning business; and Jennifer Laura Thompson, who makes and sells her own jewelry—about their other careers as business women.

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Susan Soon He Stanton, Palmer Hefferan, and Jennifer Ikeda on “Today Is My Birthday”

In “Today Is My Birthday,” a woman returns home to Hawai’i to figure out her life. In an unusual twist of form, the play’s over 50 scenes all happen over the phone, on the radio, or through other forms of indirect communication. We talk to Susan Soon He Stanton, Palmer Hefferan, and Jennifer Ikeda about the play.

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